Tag Archive for 'Anne Elizabeth Moore'

Off-Site: Quimby’s Co-sponsors the EX. MONEY. RACE. GENDER Ladydrawers Exhibition

Jun ’13
27
5:00 pm
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Quimby’s Bookstore (and our sister store, Chicago Comics) are proud to be a sponsor of the Ladydrawers Comics Collective exhibition entitled SEX. MONEY. RACE. GENDER, curated by Anne Elizabeth Moore, at Columbia College Chicago’s A+D Gallery, opening June 27th.  S.M.R.G. will also feature a series of workshops that explores hot button topics with everything from site-specific murals to performance to empirical conversations to yes, comics.
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Beginning with the opening night spectacle, the gallery (Columbia’s A+D Gallery, not Quimby’s) will be activated through fun, radicalthinking, and art making, a space to observe and reflect on ideas of SEX, MONEY, RACE, and GENDER.  Instead of creating a catalog for the show, Quimby’s is proud to co-sponsor a comics anthology including work by Robyn Chapman, Danielle Chenette, Clay Harris, Lyra Hill, MariNaomi, Corinne Mucha, Laura Szumowski, Lauren Weinstein.

SEX. MONEY. RACE. GENDER.  The Ladydrawers (of Chicago, IL)

Exhibition & Workshop Schedule

 

Opening Reception: June 27, 5:00-8:00 p.m.

Exhibit closes on July 27th

Curated by Anne Elizabeth Moore

S.M.R.G OPENING NIGHT EXTRAVAGANZA!

Featuring comedy, art making, readings, performance, and much more. Come explore issues of SEX, MONEY, RACE, and GENDER with a sprinkling of humor and pathos through stand up comedy, femcore anthems, live mural making, and interpretations of texts, personal readings (in the bathroom!), and even hula hooping. Join us, won’t you?

Opening Night Performers

Sarah Bell, Blizzard Babies, Gretchen Hasse, Lyra Hill, Elliott Junkyard, Francis Kang, Ever Mainard, Carolina Mayorga, Katie McVay, Yasmin Nair, Polly Yates

Exhibition Participants

Nicole Boyett, Jacinta Bunnel, Danielle Chenette, Gretchen Hasse, Elliott Junkyard, Francis Kang, Carolina Mayorga, Melissa Gira Grant, Lyra Hill, Franny Howes, Nia King, Viet Le, Nicole Marroquin, Anne Elizabeth Moore, Sarah Morton, Liz Rush, Rachel Swanson, Laura Szumowski, Bonsovathary Uoeung, Lauren Weinstein, Sarah Welch, Elizabeth White, Mara Williams, Polly Yates

S.M.R.G Workshops

These workshops are collaborative and exploratory projects lead by outstanding cultural producers and thinkers—all amazing, smart people that you will like very much.

Radical Noticing: Riot Grrrl Press and Contemporary Comics

May Summer Farnsworth and Jamie Davida Lee

Saturday, June 29, 2013 2:00-4:00 p.m.

May Summer Farnsworth will discuss her experiences working on the formation of Riot Grrrl Press in 1993. Cartoonist Jamie Davida Lee will simultaneously lead a silent workshop on making comics and zines.

Lexicon of Sexicana

Esther Pearl Watson and Terri Kapsalis

Thursday, July 11, 2013, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Speech balloons! Giant boons! Big muscles! The hundred-year-old lexicon of comics was developed by its most prominent practitioners, mostly straight white dudes. It’s time to re-think the language of comics. Esther Pearl Watson and Terri Kapsalis will create a work exploring sexual health based on Mort Walker’s satirical look at comics devices for cartoonists, The Lexicon of Comicana.

Life and Labor

Delia Jean Hickey and Sarah Jaffe

Thursday, July 18, 2013, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

We all know what it means to work, but what extra effort do certain forms of labor extract from us? This workshop explores what it takes to make an honest living, with a particular focus on the service industry.

Boi Band Poser Poster Workshop

Viet Le and Morgan Claire

Thursday, July 25, 2013, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

This workshop challenges identities and identifications through pop and props. Thinking through gender, race, and (inner and outer) space, participants will form and “perform” their own pop bands and solo acts. Fun FOBulous times!

Please note: these events are at the A+D Gallery at 619 S. Wabash Ave, Chicago, Il 60605, NOT QUIMBY’S BOOKSTORE.

Anne Elizabeth Moore Reads From Hip Hop Apsara: Ghosts Past and Present 9/28

Sep ’12
28
7:00 pm

The city of Phnom Penh, Cambodia hosts public dance lessons most nights on a newly revitalized riverfront directly in front of prime minister Hun Sen’s urban home. Shortly before dusk, much of the city gathers to bust a few Apsara moves and learn a couple choreographed hip- hop steps from a slew of attractive young men at the head of each group. Outside the bustling capital city, the provinces come alive, too, as the nation’s only all-girl political rock group sets up concerts that call into question the international garment trade, traditional gender roles, and agriculture under globalization. Cambodia is changing: not what it once was, not yet what it will be.  Hip Hop Apsara: Ghosts Past and Present provides images of a nation’s people emerging from generations of poverty.

Following on the heels of Cambodian Grrrl: Self-Publishing in Phnom Penh, Anne Elizabeth Moore compiled photographs that document Cambodia’s bustling nightlife, the nation’s emerging middle class, and the ongoing struggle for social justice in the beautiful, war-ravaged land.

A series of essays complement the imagery, investigating the relationship between public and private space, mourning and memory, tradition and economic development. It is a document of a nation caught between states of being, yet still deeply affecting.

“Radical” (L.A. Times), “poignant” (Boston Globe), “should not be missed (Time), “a notable underground author” (The Onion), and “brilliant” (Kirkus) are all ways to describe Anne Elizabeth Moore and her writing. The award-winning author and artist has worked for years with young women in Cambodia on independent media projects, and her newest venture is a compilation of photographs and lyrical essays taking readers to the streets of the country’s capital city, Phnom Penh, and out into the countryside— where few get to travel. Hip Hop Apsara: Ghosts Past and Present released Aug. 28, 2012 from Green Lantern Press.

Alternating full color and black and white photographs depict Phnom Penh’s bustling nightlife as locals gather to dance on a newly revitalized riverfront directly in front of their prime minister’s urban home, thus forming a portrait of the nation’s emerging middle class. Images from a southern province depict a nation in dialogue with its government, hoping for development that lifts all citizens. A series of essays complement the imagery, investigating the relationship between public and private space, mourning and memory, tradition and an economic development unrivaled in the last 1,200 years.

“Traditional movements push against young passions,” Moore writes. “Development is fluid and janky. But a generation is learning what comfort feels like, learning what it feels like to have survived. To celebrate, to honor, they dance most nights like they are possessed.”

Hip Hop Apsara aims to break through the cavalier and hardened consciousness many hold about Cambodian culture and its recent, violent, past under the Khmer Rouge.

“People seem rooted in this belief that Cambodia’s very far away and very weird,” Moore said. “It is far away, but for 14 million Cambodians, it’s not weird at all – plus it’s a place the US has had a lot of negative influence over. So it seems like we should know something about it, as Americans.”

A Fulbright scholar, Moore is the Truthout columnist behind Ladydrawers: Gender and Comics in the US, and the author of Cambodian Grrrl: Self-Publishing in Phnom Penh (Cantankerous Titles, 2011), Unmarketable: Brandalism, Copyfighting, Mocketing, and the Erosion of Integrity (The New Press, 2007) and Hey Kidz, Buy This Book (Soft Skull, 2004). She was co-editor and publisher of the now-defunct Punk Planet, and founding editor of the Best American Comics series from Houghton Mifflin. She has twice been noted in the Best American Non-Required Reading series.

Anne Elizabeth Moore is a Fulbright scholar, the Truthout columnist behind Ladydrawers: Gender and Comics in the US, and the author of Cambodian Grrrl: Self-Publishing in Phnom Penh (Cantankerous Titles, 2011), Unmarketable: Brandalism, Copyfighting, Mocketing, and the Erosion of Integrity (The New Press, 2007, named a Best Book of the Year by Mother Jones) and Hey Kidz, Buy This Book (Soft Skull, 2004). Co-editor and publisher of the now-defunct Punk Planet, and founding editor of the Best American Comics series from Houghton Mifflin, Moore teaches in the Visual Critical Studies and Art History departments at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She works with young women in Cambodia on independent media projects, and with people of all ages and genders on media and gender justice work in the US. Her journalism focuses on the international garment trade. Moore exhibits her work frequently as conceptual art, and has been the subject of two documentary films. She has lectured around the world on independent media, globalization, and women’s labor issues. The multi-award-winning author has also written for N+1, Good, Snap Judgment, Bitch, the Progressive, The Onion, Feministing, The Stranger, In These Times, The Boston Phoenix, and Tin House. She has twice been noted in the Best American Non-Required Reading series. She has appeared on CNN, WNUR, WFMU, WBEZ, Voice of America, and others. Her work with young women in Southeast Asia has been featured in USA Today, Phnom Penh Post, Entertainment Weekly, Time Out Chicago, Make/Shift, Today’s Chicago Woman, Windy City Times, and Print Magazine, and on GritTV, Radio Australia, and NPR’s Worldview. Moore recently mounted a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and participated in Artisterium, Georgia’s annual art invitational. Her upcoming book, Hip Hop Apsara: Ghosts Past and Present (Green Lantern Press, Aug. 28, 2012), is a lyrical essay in pictures and words exploring the people of Cambodia’s most rampant economic development in at least 1,200 years.

BOOK DETAILS
Hardcover, $20 ISBN: 978-1-4507-7526-7 Photo/Essay, 100 pages Green Lantern Press

For more info:
AnneElizabethMoore.com
@superanne
Publicity: JKSCommunications.com

Anne Elizabeth Moore Reads From Cambodian Grrrl With Sara Drake 9/29

Sep ’11
29
7:00 pm

In Anne Elizabeth Moore’s new book Cambodian Grrrl: Self-Publishing in Phnom Penh, the writer and independent publisher brings her experience in the American cultural underground to Cambodia, a country known mostly for the savage extermination of around 2 million of its own under the four-year reign of the Khmer Rouge.

“1000000000000000% punk rock.” -The Jacksonville Public Library

“The best travel book I’ve read this year.” -USA Today

Moore is a columnist for Truthout, and has written for The Progressive, Bitch, Annalemma, Tin House, the Boston Phoenix, and The Onion. The former editor of Punk Planet and the Comics Journal, Moore received a Fulbright to continue her work in Cambodia in 2010, and recently held a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. Her book Unmarketable was said to offer “something distinctly more radical than merely protesting against consumerism: a total rejection of the competitive ethos that drives capitalist culture” by the LA Times; deemed “a work of honesty and, yes, integrity” by Kirkus and called “sharp and valuable muckraking” by Time Out New York. It was also named a Best Book of 2007 by Mother Jones. See more at: anneelizabethmoore.com

Moore will be joined by Chicago cartoonist and writer Sara Drake, currently planning a comics project in Cambodia. Find out more here: http://iydcpc.wordpress.com

Thurs, Sep 29th, 7pm

Burn Collector #15 Zine Release Event with Al Burian, Anne Elizabeth Moore and Liam Warfield on 3/22

Mar ’11
22
7:30 pm

Celebrating fifteen years of publication as well as the appearance of issue number 15, Al Burian returns to Quimby’s to present a new installment of his long-running personal zine Burn Collector. Burian began distributing his work through the tight-knit network of the DIY punk music scene in the mid-nineties. Burn Collector caught on because of its unusual content—in a scene rife with dogmatic diatribes and bland record reviews, Burian presented his readers with humorous anecdotes, philosophical musings, nuanced descriptions of odd locales and curious characters. Burn Collector #15 is the “Berlin vs. Chicago” issue: contents include an essay on the Berlin Wall by Chicago’s Anne Elizabeth Moore, and an interview with Chicago zine hero Liam Warfield, who debunks the myth of the endless techno party.

Al Burian was a Chicago resident from 2000-2008. His book, Burn Collector: Collected Stories from One through Nine has just been republished by PM Press. He currently lives in Berlin.

“Al Burian is one of our generation’s great storytellers, a wily and insightful observer of the human condition.”      -Davy Rothbart, Found Magazine and This American Life

“Al Burian has become one of the most cultishly adored figures in the American punk underground. Burn Collector pairs existential dread with rapacious wit.” -Jessica Hopper, Chicago Reader

“Al Burian produces zines with a stubborn refusal to write dumbly.” -Sam McPheeters

Also joining the bill will be BC#15 contributors Liam Warfield (War Against the Idiots, The Skeleton, Secret Beach) and Anne Elizabeth Moore (Unmarketable: Brandalism, Copyfighting, Mocketing, and the Erosion of Integrity, former editor of now-defunct Punk Planet)

Tuesday, March 22, 2011 7:30 pm

Canada’s Illegal Ad Vigilante Rami Tabello With Anne Elizabeth Moore at Quimby’s 11/12

Nov ’10
12
7:00 pm

“We fight illegal advertising using the rule of law,” Rami Tabello says when asked to describe the Toronto organization he founded to fight criminal billboards, Illegal Signs. It’s funded through donations and Tabello’s gambling take—a crazy support system for a group that spends a lot of time scrutinizing city bylaws and calling in complaints to the proper authorities. Tabello’s been called both “a fearless advocate for public space” and “annoying” by Toronto city residents and elected officials. He’ll present his work fighting—and beating—corporate criminals at Quimby’s in Chicago, a city with a massive illegal advertising problem of its own.

Tabello is presented by Chicago author Anne Elizabeth Moore on the occasion of the re-release of the underground hit The Manifesti of Radical Literature (MRL). Out of print for over a year, MRL is an anarchist style guide for cultural producers, with chapters on such foundational political acts as throwing away one’s dictionary, creating one’s own system of punctuation, and refusing to abide by the language imposed upon us by corporate entities. Also, it is funny and of a pleasing form and light heft, perfect for spiriting away in one’s back pocket for an evening of street stenciling or shopdropping. The expanded second edition, features a new Introduction and Afterword­ and improved jokes. Moore’s Unmarketable received favorable reviews in Forbes, the LA Times, Advertising Age, and the Guardian, and was called “an anti-corporate manifesto with a difference” by Mother Jones and “sharp and valuable muckraking” by Time Out New York.

Come hear about the work of Illegal Signs, pick up a copy of MRL, and meet Tabello and Moore at 7 p.m. on Friday, November 12.

For more info:

Truthout

Pressing Concern

Previous edition of Manifesti