Tag Archive for 'comics'

Page 2 of 5

Laydeez Do Comics in June, CAKE-Inspired Edition: Mita Mahato & Zan Christensen 6/13

Jun ’13
13
7:00 pm

Laydeez Do Comics is London’s monthly comics salon. Quimby’s is host to the Chicago edition. Come hear comics creators speak about their work, their process, their plans, and whatever else they want to share with us.

The special June CAKE-inspired edition will feature Seattle visitors:

Cartoonist and academic Mita Mahato is an associate professor of English at University of Puget Sound. Her academic work often incorporates graphic novels, specifically those around illness. She is currently working on her own graphic novel in collage about grief and the loss of her mother. View her work in progress on her blog, theseframesarehidingplaces.com

Mita Mahato

LGBT comics writer and activist Charles ‘Zan’ Christensen founded Seattle’s Northwest Press in 2010. It’s a book publisher dedicated to publishing the best lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender comics collections and graphic novels and celebrating the LGBT comics community. He travels the country promoting and supporting his award winning creators. northwestpress.com

Peruse NW Press titles at http://northwestpress.com.

NW Press logo

For more info: laydeezdocomics.com and  comicnurse@mac.com

off-site but of interest: Long-Arm Stapler First Aid: OPENING RECEPTION at Spudnik Press Cooperative

Apr ’13
20
6:00 pm
Long-Arm-WEB
Long-Arm Stapler First Aid: Self-Care In Zines and Mini Comics

Curated by Liz Mason and Neil Brideau
4/20/13 – 5/31/13
 
Opening Reception: April 20, 2013 6:00 – 9:00pm
The Annex @ Spudnik Press Cooperative,
1821 W Hubbard, Suite 303, Chicago, IL
(NOT at Quimby’s)
Whether we’re soothing, grooming or creating major life changes, we’re always involved in some sort of self-care, no matter how big or trivial. Drinking coffee, petting animals, getting stuff off our chests, confronting personal and societal demons, we are perpetually creating a space for our own personal world to exist healthfully in the bigger world. Indeed, the personal is social.
Instead of relying on professional services, one can create change using a DIY mentality, often with the help of some sort of reference. At their core, the pieces in this group show suggest we must be our own proponents for health and well-being.
The exhibit “Long-Arm Stapler First Aid” features pieces by a variety of zinesters and comics artists. The pieces discuss and/or illustrate self-care topics that both help themselves and inspire the reader to be their own advocate in self-improvement. In honor of self-publishing as a means to foster well-being, Spudnik Press is proud to host this exhibition featuring dozens of zine makers from across the country, including Edie Fake, Rinko Endo, Kathleen McIntyre, Ramsey Beyer, Liz Prince, Dina Kelberman, Sara McHenry, Maris Wicks, Beth Barnett, Nate Beaty, Raleigh Briggs, Danielle Chenette, Emilja Frances, Turtel Onli, Trubble Club, Caroline Paquita, Sarah McNeil, Milo Miller, Corinne Mucha, Kitari Sporrong, Missy Kulik, Cathy Leamy, Erick Lyle and more.
Long Arm Stapler First Aid will also include a limited edition exhibition zine, compiled by Liz Mason, encompassing relevant self-care themes in zines and mini-comics such as: healing, grief, fitness, and medical issues. The exhibit will also feature a limited edition screenprint by Ramsey Beyer, published by Spudnik Press.
 
This show brings together an assortment of zines and comics that address health-related issues ranging from mental to physical, personal to societal, and preventative to regenerative, including such specifics as grooming, food preparation, self-defense, coping strategies, defense mechanisms, mental or spiritual development and even soul enrichment. These largely self-published works address, at times, incredibly personal experiences, usually with a large dose of wit.
Unlike a film or a painting, readers of zines and comics are able to engage with these works at their own pace, choosing when they are ready to confront the next page. Perhaps this is what allows authors to broach difficult, and often very personal, topics with great breadth of emotion, honesty, and clarity. Through the combination of words and images, artists are able to rely on multiple modes of communication to bring together the tangible and the cerebral.
Why the long-arm stapler? It’s the symbol of home-stapled periodicals, the best kind of stapler to use for getting to the center of the page that a normal stapler can’t reach. And the very act of making a zine and mini comic (and reading) is considered a therapeutic caring action.
Long live (and maintain, groom and sooth) the long-arm stapler!
About the curators:
Liz Masonis the manager of Quimby’s Bookstore, known for selling a variety of self-published works, as well as the editor and publisher for the zine Caboose.

Neil Brideau is comics artist and comics sommelier at Quimby’s Bookstore, as well as an organizer of CAKE, Chicago’s Alternative Comics Expo.

*Image Credit to Dina Kelbermann

Anne Elizabeth Moore Reads From Cambodian Grrrl With Sara Drake 9/29

Sep ’11
29
7:00 pm

In Anne Elizabeth Moore’s new book Cambodian Grrrl: Self-Publishing in Phnom Penh, the writer and independent publisher brings her experience in the American cultural underground to Cambodia, a country known mostly for the savage extermination of around 2 million of its own under the four-year reign of the Khmer Rouge.

“1000000000000000% punk rock.” -The Jacksonville Public Library

“The best travel book I’ve read this year.” -USA Today

Moore is a columnist for Truthout, and has written for The Progressive, Bitch, Annalemma, Tin House, the Boston Phoenix, and The Onion. The former editor of Punk Planet and the Comics Journal, Moore received a Fulbright to continue her work in Cambodia in 2010, and recently held a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. Her book Unmarketable was said to offer “something distinctly more radical than merely protesting against consumerism: a total rejection of the competitive ethos that drives capitalist culture” by the LA Times; deemed “a work of honesty and, yes, integrity” by Kirkus and called “sharp and valuable muckraking” by Time Out New York. It was also named a Best Book of 2007 by Mother Jones. See more at: anneelizabethmoore.com

Moore will be joined by Chicago cartoonist and writer Sara Drake, currently planning a comics project in Cambodia. Find out more here: http://iydcpc.wordpress.com

Thurs, Sep 29th, 7pm

Quimby’s Bookstore Podcast #3 Is Up!

Editor Ryan Standfest discusses BLACK EYE 1: Graphic Transmissions to Cause Ocular Hypertension, an anthology that collects original narrative comics, art and essays by 41 international artists and writers, all focused on the expression of black, dark or absurdist humor. (And yes, we carry it at Quimby’s.) Ryan was here this past June 24th, to celebrate the Chicago release with some of the local artists included in the anthology.

With comics and art by Stéphane Blanquet, Ivan Brunetti, Lilli Carré, Max Clotfelter, Al Columbia, Ludovic Debeurme, Olivier Deprez, Nikki DeSautelle, Brecht Evens, Andy Gabrysiak, Robert Goodin, Dav Guedin, Gnot Guedin, Glenn Head, Danny Hellman, Paul Hornschemeier, Ian Huebert, Kaz, Michael Kupperman, Mats!?, Fanny Michaëlis, James Moore, Tom Neely, Mark Newgarden, Paul Nudd, Onsmith, Emelie Östergren, Paul Paetzel, David Paleo, Martin Rowson, Olivier Schrauwen, Stephen Schudlich, Robert Sikoryak, Ryan Standfest, Brecht Vandenbroucke, Wouter Vanhaelemeesch and Jon Vermilyea. Original essays by Jeet Heer (on S. Clay Wilson), Bob Levin (on “The Adventures of Phoebe Zeit-Geist”), Ken Parille (on Steve Ditko) and Ryan Standfest (on Al Feldstein and EC). Also includes the text “100 Good Reasons to Kill Myself Right Now,” by Roland Topor, translated into English for the first time by Edward Gauvin. You can find us on podbean or on I-Tunes (just do a search for Quimby’s Bookstore. And don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast at either of those places. And yes! Subscription to the podcast is FREE.

Modern-Day Griot Arthur Flowers Shares His Graphic Novel on Dr. MLK Jr. 2/12

Feb ’11
12
7:00 pm

In celebration of Black History Month, Arthur Flowers celebrates I See the Promised Land: A Life of Martin Luther King, Jr., a singular take on the graphic novel genre, an extraordinary jam session between two very distinct storytelling traditions. Flowers tells a masterful story in musical prose. Artist Manu Chitrakar, a scroll-painter from Bengal, India, carries the tale confidently into the vivid idiom of Patua art, turning King’s journey into a truly universal legacy. replete with destiny, fate and the human condition, I See the Promised Land traverses the milestones of King’s short life, his ministry and journey, in a dramatic collaboration.

“Both evocative and factually rich…a standout both as a distinctive graphic narrative that combines two world storytelling traditions and as an examination of King’s life and its enduring legacy across the globe.” – Booklist Starred Review

Arthur Flowers, a remarkable performance artist and oral historian, originally hails from Memphis. He is an associate professor of English at Syracuse University. Arthur is a captivating presence, memorizing his text, singing from the story in a free-form jive style and accompanying himself with a small African drum. He performs with select pieces of the original Patua scroll artwork. Arthur is also the author of Another Good Loving Blues and De Mojo Blues.

Saturday, February 12, 7pm